Ham vanity callsign-W5YI : Introduction to Vanity Call Signs

Vanity Call Signs: For a listing of the ham call signs from the FCC's database that will be coming available tomorrow for submission on a vanity license request, links to call signs that will be coming available in the future, and for a listing of the ham vanity applications that have been granted by the FCC, and for links to the applications that have alread been filed with the FCC and the status of those applications, click on the "vanity calls" link to the left. For quick links to ham vanity calls that will be coming available and to applications that have already been filed with the fcc, click on the buttons below. The information is sorted and may be viewed by call prefix, district or suffix as indicated below. The menu items to the left of this text will take you to the many items available to you on the RadioQTH site. Toggle navigation Menu.

Ham vanity callsign

Ham vanity callsign

Ham vanity callsign

Ham vanity callsign

Views Read Medicines for female vulva View history. Numerous other cases of multiple numeral prefixes exist. My Awards. Ham vanity callsign radio operators in the United States may apply for a specific callsign, including calls from other zones, so long as they have the appropriate license class for the desired callsign format. Vanity Call Signs About the Program The FCC offers amateur licensees the opportunity to vantiy a specific call sign for a primary station and for a club station. In response to Resolution 99 Rev.

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The requestor may list up to twenty-five call signs in order of preference. Online Swapmeet A virtual hamfest with real good stuff! The information is sorted and may be viewed by call prefix, district or suffix as indicated below. The information for cancellation of a call sign must be submitted prior to filing the vanity application. Your name and mailing address as shown on your current license grant must be correct. It is Ham vanity callsign and you can choose from different formats:. Then use the copy to enter your information. Ham vanity callsign jurisdiction then assigns a single digit a numeral Britney spears red latex separate prefix from suffix as well calldign a suffix of from 1 to four characters the last being a letter and appends them in that order to their assigned prefix es. A New Zealand amateur who has been active for 30 years and currently is assigned call sign ZL1xxx can operate as ZL30xxx for vaniy to three months. Site information: This site provides simplified web pages that support handheld computers, PDAs, and web-enabled phones. These web sites are of great service to Extra class hams.

Amateur radio call signs are allocated to amateur radio operators around the world.

  • You can pick your own ham radio call sign within certain limits, of course.
  • Contribute to QRZ.
  • Luscre K8ZT.

Luscre K8ZT. You have decided to change your call sign. Maybe you just upgraded your license, moved to a new call area or decided you want a shorter call. Maybe you want something easier to use in contests, a call that is easier for your friends to remember or just plain don't like the way your call "sounds" or "looks". Hams treat call signs with a special reverence, attaching a whole personality to a short sequence of numbers and letters, so changing your call can be an intimidating event.

No matter the reason, this article can help you choose your "ideal" vanity call sign. First, before we get started on choosing your call sign, a little "how-to" information. There are some great sites that will give you all the information you need to know to be successful in applying for and obtaining your selected call sign:.

The ARRL site at www. Radio QTH at www. HamData at www. What makes an "ideal call sign"? First of all, there is no universal "ideal call sign". Everyone's choice will be personal for them and limited by the group of call signs available to them based on their license class, geographic location, previously issued call signs, etc. Your first step should be to check for available and soon to be available call signs from sites above. Selection of your "ideal call sign" can first be divided into 3 categories based on your reason for wanting a new call.

Personalized call sign choices can include initials, name, location, nickname, club name, etc. Selection of these is usually pretty easy, simply browse through available call signs to see if one matching your choice is available.

In order to increase your chances of finding something that matches do not forget to check all combinations, not just suffixes e. I stewed for a long time on selecting my new OC call sign. I finally made up a spreadsheet and ranked all the potential calls on a number of criteria categories then ranked their scores. The criteria used was collected from a number of sources including articles by experienced contesters and DXers, phonetics studies, psychology and learning studies, graphic arts and marketing studies, personal experience and subjective input from fellow hams.

Optimized Character Criteria Considered Included:. Number of characters- total letters and number s. Total le ngth of weighted characters- the total number of dits x 1 plus the total number of dahs x 3. Phonetic clarity- how the call sounds in phonetics and how easy and clear each phonetic is to pronounce. How the rhythm sounds in CW I put calls into my keyer's memory and "played them back" at various speeds to listen to them or you can use any of the online code generating sites on my Morse Code web page at www.

It is free and you can choose from different formats:. Then use the copy to enter your information. Other criteria you could use might include difficulty in sending a letter in CW, letters difficult in certain foreign languages, similarity to "well known" call signs, etc.. Well, this may sound obsessive and my wife told me it definitely was!

After you have selected and ranked your call sign selections, you need to complete your FCC Vanity Application. For invaluable help with this process, please refer to the three URLs presented near the beginning of this article.

Then the wait begins as you hope the FCC grants you one of your top choices. Fortunately, the process usually takes less than one month. I hope to hear you on the air soon with your "ideal call sign". Search this site. Home Blog News News. DX News. Tips for New Hams. Digital Modes.

Radio Amateur's Conversation Guide. My Awards. My QSLs. KX 2nd Look. Amateur Radio Software. Ham Radio Youth Resources. Kids Radio Zone. Teacher Radio Zone. ZTLearn Educational Resources. Ham Youth Resources. Luscre K8ZT You have decided to change your call sign. There are some great sites that will give you all the information you need to know to be successful in applying for and obtaining your selected call sign: The ARRL site at www.

Help Save The U. You can change your name or address at the time of your vanity call sign request, by filing FCC Form Two letter prefix with first letter K or W. See Section However, both allow a second numeral as the leading character of the suffix and is not to be confused with the sign's separating numeral. Canadian license statistics. However, this does not hamper any party from asserting such rights as it may have under private law in some other forum.

Ham vanity callsign

Ham vanity callsign

Ham vanity callsign

Ham vanity callsign

Ham vanity callsign

Ham vanity callsign. Ham Radio Dummies, 2nd Edition

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Application Search - Vanity Call Sign Application Search

Amateur radio call signs are allocated to amateur radio operators around the world. The call signs are used to legally identify the station or operator, with some countries requiring the station call sign to always be used and others allowing the operator call sign instead.

The International Telecommunication Union ITU allocates call sign prefixes for radio and television stations of all types. Since these have been used to uniquely identify operators and locate amateur stations within a geographical region or country of the world.

Call signs meant for amateur radio follow the ITU's Article 19, specifically Prefixes are assigned internationally, and a separating numeral plus suffix are added by a national body to produce this unique identifier. These prefixes are agreed upon internationally, and are a form of country code.

Each country must only assign call signs to its nationals or operators under its jurisdiction that begin with the characters allocated for use in that country or its territories. In some countries, an operator may also select their own "vanity" call sign that conforms to local laws. The FCC in the U. The prefix can be composed of letters or numbers, the separating numeral is one from 0 to 9, and a suffix is from one to four characters, usually letters.

Call signs begin with a one- two- or three-character prefix chosen from a range assigned by the ITU to the amateur's country of operation or other internationally recognized jurisdiction.

This is not necessarily always the amateur's country of citizenship. An individual operator is assigned a unique call sign beginning with this prefix and then completed with a separating numeral and suffix.

Beginning at the left of the call sign block, the country chooses one, two or three characters from within the range assigned by the ITU, enough to distinguish its call signs from other jurisdictions. A "letter range" always first refers to the first letter of a block, meaning that in the letter range "AAA—ALZ", the "A" is the letter range-designator. The jurisdiction then assigns a single digit a numeral to separate prefix from suffix as well as a suffix of from 1 to four characters the last being a letter and appends them in that order to their assigned prefix es.

The resulting call sign must uniquely identify a ham radio operator within that jurisdiction. This produces internationally recognized, unique call signs to identify licensed operators. Since suffixes can also contain digits, some countries issue suffixes usually temporarily beginning with enough digits to produce a number, usually associated with the special event for example the number of years, see New Zealand below. In normal call sign assignment, if a call sign has two digits e.

When the digits abut one another, it is important to distinguish which digit belongs to the prefix, which is the separating numeral, and which may belong to the suffix. An example is A33A, a Tongan call sign; the first '3' is the second character of the prefix and the second '3' is the numeral separating 'A3' from the single-letter suffix 'A'. There are no single letter prefixes allocated by the ITU with an 'A', so the first 3 must be part of the prefix.

Neither New Zealand's nor the Republic of Ireland's prefixes have numerals as prefix-characters. However, both allow a second numeral as the leading character of the suffix and is not to be confused with the sign's separating numeral. As the first character of the suffix, the two digits can be taken together; for instance, to represent a two-digit number of significance to the operator.

A New Zealand amateur who has been active for 30 years and currently is assigned call sign ZL1xxx can operate as ZL30xxx for up to three months. Similarly a club with call ZL4xxx which has been established for 23 years can operate as ZL23xxx for up to three months.

The New Zealand operator substitutes their identifying separating numeral with another, so long as a second digit is added to the beginning of their normal suffix. This may result in call sign confusion in the rare case of two amateurs in differing numeral-areas also both having the same number of years of operation and suffix.

Ofcom in Great Britain also allows numerals in special event call signs. Numerous other cases of multiple numeral prefixes exist. An example occurred in when the "" was used in place of district numbers for the many stations that celebrated the bicentennial of the U.

The 26 letters of the English alphabet and ten digits may be used to form call signs, accented letters excluded. Letter combinations which can be confused with distress calls or which are reserved as abbreviations for radiocommunications services are excluded e.

Q codes. Malawi assigned the 7QA—7QZ block. Double- or single-digit prefixes are excluded. A callsign with a leading digit in the prefix always has a second character which is a letter and in rare cases a third character which is also a letter. Currently, no allocated prefix has 0 zero or 1 one as one of its characters as they can be confused with the letters O Oscar and I India. All ten digits from 0 to 9 are allowed to be used as a separating numeral at the discretion of national allocating bodies.

Similar rules apply in cases when bilateral agreements on visitors licenses exist, or a visitor is permitted to operate without being assigned a local call sign. When a country's separating numeral denotes a geographic area within, an operator from one region operating in another region can affix a secondary suffix indicating so. Depending on the jurisdiction, the use of these five suffixes may be required for these types of operation. Some jurisdictions discourage this practice on the grounds that it could be confused with an amateur from the repeater's location working portable in Russia.

Each national authority has some options in relation to the form of the prefix, as long as enough characters are selected starting from the left of their assigned block to produce a prefix unique to its jurisdiction. Each country has authority over which numeral separates the prefix and suffix. The prohibition of the use of the digits 0 and 1 in land mobile stations does not apply to amateur stations.

The ITU however does not issue prefixes with either a 0 or 1 as one of the characters. Bahamas issues call signs without a separating numeral. They are assigned the C6A—C6Z block, and the '6' is part of the prefix. Examples are as found on QRZ. The suffix can be from one to four characters subject to ITU exclusions above. Whereas for ITU purposes the prefix does not include the separating numeral, for country purposes often the separating numeral is included when the prefix is referred to.

A country can consist of many DXCC entities depending on its geographical make-up. As political boundaries change through treaty or warfare, sometimes call sign prefixes are reassigned by the ITU to the new controlling government, or are reassigned by national governments for other reasons.

Some call sign block ranges are unassigned by the ITU, e. Any call sign used by an amateur in these unassigned block ranges usually had it assigned to them by a group with an unrecognized national claim. In addition, during their period of independence from the Republic of South Africa , which lasted in some cases from —, the Bantustans had prefixes not recognized by the international community.

These were:. Any country or ITU prefix assignment can have many entities within it. For example, in the United States Hawaii with 'H' as the second character of the prefix and '6' as the separating numeral and Alaska with 'L' as the second letter of the prefix are considered different DXCC entities, as are Sable Island and St. Paul Island in Canada. DeSoto's landmark QST article defining a "country" as a discrete geographical entity.

It refers to a list of saltwater islands worldwide maintained by the Radio Society of Great Britain , which assigns a unique code to an island or group of islands, like EU for Great Britain , OC for Australia etc.

In many other cases there is no direct relation between the callsign and the IOTA code. Ham radio operators in the United States may apply for a specific callsign, including calls from other zones, so long as they have the appropriate license class for the desired callsign format.

In Canada, a "2 x 3" call a format with two letters, a number, three letters, like VE1ZZZ may be freely requested from a list of available calls; the shorter "2 x 2" call has a waiting period in many provinces. The U. An Amateur Extra might have W0OL which is a "1 x 2" call , but a General-class licensee could not, because 1 x 2 calls are reserved for the Amateur Extra class. Likewise, a ham on the mainland could not get a callsign beginning with the KH6 prefix, which is assigned to Hawaii, although a radio amateur who moves to a different call sign district within the same country is able to keep his or her original callsign.

Individual amateurs may want a callsign with their name or initials embedded, callsigns that had been held by family members or friends, or callsigns that they themselves formerly held and gave up for whatever reason. Some people want a callsign that is shorter, or easier to pronounce, or just "fits their personality" better.

CW Morse code operators might want a callsign that "sounds good" or is short when sent in Morse. This is referred to as "CW weight". Radio amateur clubs will sometimes request specific callsigns in memoriam of deceased members silent keys ; G5RV is held by a British club in memory of the inventor of the G5RV antenna.

Some request callsigns which reflect specific interests or modes of operation such as VE3QRP for a low-power radio club in Ontario. Various "special event" callsigns are issued for periods ranging from a day to a month, either for individual radio contest days or commemoration of specific current or historic events. Occasionally, a radio club will obtain a shorter callsign for a day; the U.

FCC issues calls as short as 1 x 1 with "K1D" being a popular choice for individual events. These callsigns are not permanent and are quickly reassigned to other stations for subsequent events.

A well-known short callsign is JY1, which belonged to Hussein of Jordan , who served as that nation's king. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Amateur radio. Retrieved Retrieved 27 August For example, the call sign 9XB was issued in Rwanda in Chile has also issued similar call signs, for example CD Archived from the original PDF on Archived from the original on Archived from the original on 18 January Retrieved 22 October Ham Gallery.

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Ham vanity callsign

Ham vanity callsign

Ham vanity callsign