Vanity fair reese changed ending-Vanity Fair (novel) - Wikipedia

So says one of her fascinated observers as Becky Sharp transforms herself from the impoverished orphan of an alcoholic painter into an adornment of the middle, if not the upper, reaches of the British aristocracy. Reese Witherspoon reflects both of those qualities effortlessly in this new film by Mira Nair , and no wonder, for isn't there a little of Elle Woods, her character in " Legally Blonde ," at work here? When William Makepeace Thackeray wrote his funny and quietly savage novel, there were few career prospects for an educated young woman who did not fancy prostitution. She could become a governess, a teacher, a servant, a religious or a wife. The only male profession open to her was writing, which she could practice without the permission or license of men; that accounts for such as Jane Austen , the Brontes, George Eliot, Mrs.

Vanity fair reese changed ending

Then he bids goodbye to Dobbin and Amelia, and of course slips in the reference to her as afir parasite. She also fails to manipulate Miss Crawley through Rawdon so as to obtain an inheritance. Technical Specs. Zombieland: Double Tap. After leaving school, Becky stays with Amelia Sedley "Emmy"who is a good-natured, simple-minded, young girl, of a wealthy London family. However, even Becky, who is amoral and cunning, is thrown on her own resources by poverty and its stigma. The style is highly indebted to Henry Fielding.

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Amy is a sociopath. And she definitely abandoned and neglected her son. She urges Amelia to love Vanity fair reese changed ending, who has remained her loyal friend for many years. We like the idea of Amy and Nick facing off again, but not under these lame faux circumstances. Douglas Hodge as Pitt Crawley. Rawdon has been passed over for inheritance by both his aunt and father, and the couple are sinking deep into debt. In latethe star Vanity fair reese changed ending Stupid bitches getting fucked for the premiere of "Sing" in Los Angeles. Andrew Shepard Price as Casino Stranger. And it's true. Gabriel Byrne as The Marquess of Steyne. But if he writes this kind of black-and-white ending, then the characters will be revealed as the puppets they are and we will be able to walk away totally unaffected by the whole novel. Andrew Sarris.

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Lots of 19th-century writers grumble about how totally bogus endings in novels usually are. And it's true. At the end of a work of fiction, readers expect one thing and one thing only — a fitting comeuppance for the bad guy like the climactic, drawn-out, and creatively grotesque death of every action movie villain — picture the Emperor in Star Wars plummeting down that shaft and exploding and an awesome prize for the good guy who tends to win the love interest and is generally expected to live happily ever after.

This kind of thing works just fine for formulaic novels and movies, but what if the whole point of your writing is to not be formulaic? Starting with the subtitle of the novel, Thackeray lets us know that he is trying to overturn expectations.

Seriously, "A Novel Without a Hero"? When's the last time you came across a story that had no good guys at all? That's why, when it comes time for the ending, the same old rewards and punishments routine just isn't going to cut it, even if it's what the readers want.

First part of the maneuver: Thackeray deals with the characters with the same realism that he has been using to describe them throughout the whole work. All along we've been waiting for Becky to really get it, right? And she definitely abandoned and neglected her son. At the same time, it seems like Amelia is going to finally get something nice for a change, since her life has been spent pining for a dead husband and taking care of her son and parents without complaining too much.

But we don't get our nice resolutions. Not by a long shot. Amelia does get a new husband in the end Instead, he loves "his little Janey, of whom he is fonder than of anything in the world — fonder even than of his History of the Punjaub" Meanwhile, Becky doesn't do too badly at all.

Second part of the maneuver: After this elaborate and realistically amoral distribution of good and bad things, Thackeray is ready to blow the reader's mind yet again.

Are you ready? Maybe sit down first. That's about as one-dimensional as a fictional character can get! In a few words, Thackeray seems to be undoing all of the work of the previous pages. What gives? We'll throw out one idea. Maybe this is way to have his cake and eat it, too.

See, he knows all about the formulaic, happily-every-after ending we all want. But if he writes this kind of black-and-white ending, then the characters will be revealed as the puppets they are and we will be able to walk away totally unaffected by the whole novel.

But this way, when none of the characters one gets her just desserts, we are so scandalized that we cannot help having strong feelings about the characters as though they were real people. Which is when Thackeray can thumb his nose at us and remind us just how constructed everything we are reading really is.

All rights reserved. What's Up With the Epigraph? What's Up With the Ending? Analysis: What's Up With the Ending? So what does Thackeray do? He goes for a twofold approach. Cite This Page. Logging out…. Logging out You've been inactive for a while, logging you out in a few seconds I'm Still Here!

W hy's T his F unny?

Nonetheless an enjoyable romp if you are into period pieces. Feb 6, Full Review…. Eileen Atkins as Miss Matilda Crawley. Osborne finally accepted Amelia at the end of his life, and left her and George Jr. James Purefoy as Rawdon Crawley. So what does Thackeray do?

Vanity fair reese changed ending

Vanity fair reese changed ending

Vanity fair reese changed ending

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It was first published as a volume monthly serial from to , carrying the subtitle Pen and Pencil Sketches of English Society , reflecting both its satirisation of early 19th-century British society and the many illustrations drawn by Thackeray to accompany the text. It was published as a single volume in with the subtitle A Novel without a Hero , reflecting Thackeray's interest in deconstructing his era's conventions regarding literary heroism.

The story is framed as a puppet play , and the narrator, despite being an authorial voice , is somewhat unreliable. The serial was a popular and critical success; the novel is now considered a classic and has inspired several audio, film, and television adaptations. In , Vanity Fair was listed at No.

The book's title comes from John Bunyan 's Pilgrim's Progress , [a] a Dissenter allegory first published in In that work, "Vanity Fair" refers to a stop along the pilgrim's route: a never-ending fair held in a town called Vanity, which is meant to represent man's sinful attachment to worldly things.

From its appearance in Bunyan, "Vanity Fair" or a "vanity-fair" was also in general use for "the world" in a range of connotations from the blandly descriptive to the wearily dismissive to the condemning. All of these senses appear in Thackeray's work. The name "Vanity Fair" has also been used for at least 5 periodicals. The story is framed by its preface [14] and coda [15] as a puppet show taking place at a fair; the cover illustration of the serial instalments was not of the characters but of a troupe of comic actors [8] at Speakers' Corner in Hyde Park.

London, Rebecca Sharp "Becky" , daughter of an art teacher and a French dancer, is a strong-willed, cunning, moneyless, young woman determined to make her way in society. After leaving school, Becky stays with Amelia Sedley "Emmy" , who is a good-natured, simple-minded, young girl, of a wealthy London family.

Hoping to marry Sedley, the richest young man she has met, Becky entices him, but she fails. George Osborne's friend Captain William Dobbin loves Amelia, but only wishes her happiness, which is centred on George. Becky Sharp says farewell to the Sedley family and enters the service of the crude and profligate baronet Sir Pitt Crawley, who has engaged her as a governess to his daughters.

Her behaviour at Sir Pitt's house gains his favour, and after the premature death of his second wife, he proposes marriage to her. However, he finds that she has secretly married his second son, Captain Rawdon Crawley, but Becky very much regrets having done this as she had no idea that his father's wife would die so soon after. Sir Pitt's elder half sister, the spinster Miss Crawley, is very rich, having inherited her mother's fortune, and the whole Crawley family compete for her favour so she will bequeath them her wealth.

Initially her favourite is Rawdon Crawley, but his marriage with Becky enrages her. First she favours the family of Sir Pitt's brother, but when she dies, she has left her money to Sir Pitt's oldest son, also called Pitt. News arrives that Napoleon has escaped from Elba, and as a result the stockmarket becomes jittery, causing Amelia's stockbroker father, John Sedley, to become bankrupt. George's rich father forbids George to marry Amelia, who is now poor. Dobbin persuades George to marry Amelia, and George is consequently disinherited.

George is embarrassed by the vulgarity of Mrs. Major O'Dowd, the wife of the head of the regiment. Already, the newly wedded Osborne is growing tired of Amelia, and he becomes increasingly attracted to Becky, which makes Amelia jealous and unhappy.

He is also losing money to Rawdon at cards and billiards. At a ball in Brussels, George gives Becky a note inviting her to run away with him. But then the army have marching orders to the Battle of Waterloo , and George spends a tender night with Amelia and leaves. The noise of battle horrifies Amelia, and she is comforted by the brisk but kind Mrs. Becky is indifferent and makes plans for whatever the outcome if Napoleon wins, she would aim to become the mistress of one of his Marshals She also makes a profit selling her carriage and horses at inflated prices to Jos, who is seeking to flee Brussels.

Amelia bears him a posthumous son, who carries on the name George. She returns to live in genteel poverty with her parents, spending her life in memory of her husband and care of her son.

Dobbin pays for a small annuity for Amelia and expresses his love for her by small kindnesses toward her and her son. She is too much in love with her husband's memory to return Dobbin's love. Saddened, he goes with his regiment to India for many years.

Becky also has a son, named Rawdon after his father. Becky is a cold, distant mother, although Rawdon loves his son. Becky continues her ascent first in post-war Paris and then in London where she is patronised by the rich and powerful Marquis of Steyne. She is eventually presented at court to the Prince Regent and charms him further at a game of " acting charades " where she plays the roles of Clytemnestra and Philomela.

Becky is on good terms with Pitt and Jane originally, but Jane is disgusted by Becky's attitude to her son and jealous of Becky's relationship with Pitt. At the summit of their social success, Rawdon is arrested for debt, possibly at Becky's connivance. The Marquis of Steyne had given Becky money, jewels, and other gifts but Becky does not use them for expenses or to free her husband. He returns home to find Becky singing to Steyne and strikes him down on the assumption—despite her protestations of innocence—that they are having an affair.

Rawdon finds Becky's hidden bank records and leaves her, expecting Steyne to challenge him to a duel. Becky, having lost both husband and credibility, leaves England and wanders the continent, leaving her son in the care of Pitt and Lady Jane. As Amelia's adored son George grows up, his grandfather Mr Osborne relents towards him though not towards Amelia and takes him from his impoverished mother, who knows the rich old man will give him a better start in life than she could manage.

After twelve years abroad, both Joseph Sedley and Dobbin return. Dobbin professes his unchanged love to Amelia. Amelia is affectionate, but she cannot forget the memory of her dead husband. Dobbin mediates a reconciliation between Amelia and her father-in-law, who dies soon after. He had amended his will, bequeathing young George half his large fortune and Amelia a generous annuity. Becky has fallen in life. She lives among card sharps and con artists, drinking heavily and gambling.

Becky enchants Jos Sedley all over again, and Amelia is persuaded to let Becky join them. Dobbin forbids this, and reminds Amelia of her jealousy of Becky with her husband. Amelia feels that this dishonours the memory of her dead and revered husband, and this leads to a complete breach between her and Dobbin.

Dobbin leaves the group and rejoins his regiment, while Becky remains with the group. However, Becky has decided that Amelia should marry Dobbin, even though she knows Dobbin is her enemy.

Becky shows Amelia George's note, kept all this time from the eve of the Battle of Waterloo, and Amelia finally realises that George was not the perfect man she always thought, and that she has rejected a better man, Dobbin.

Amelia and Dobbin are reconciled and return to England. Becky and Jos stay in Europe. Jos dies, possibly suspiciously, after signing a portion of his money to Becky as life insurance, setting her up with an income. She returns to England, and manages a respectable life, although all her previous friends refuse to acknowledge her. This popularity is then resented by other women. She begins the work as its heroine "selected for the very reason that she was the best-natured of all" [26] and marries the dashing George Osborne against his father's wishes, but the narrator is soon forced to admit "she wasn't a heroine" after all [27] as she remains soppily devoted to him despite his neglect of her and his flirtation with Becky.

After George dies in the Battle of Waterloo , she brings up little George alone while living with her parents. She is completely dominated by her increasingly peevish mother and her spendthrift father, who, to finance one of his failing investment schemes, sells the annuity Jos had provided.

Amelia becomes obsessed with her son and the memory of her husband. She ignores William Dobbin, who courts her for years and treats him shabbily until he leaves. Only when Becky shows her George's letter to her is Amelia able to move on, though she informs Becky that she has already written to Dobbin to ask him to come back.

She eventually marries Dobbin. In a letter to his close friend Jane Octavia Brookfield while the book was being written, Thackeray confided that "You know you are only a piece of Amelia, my mother is another half, my poor little wife y est pour beaucoup ".

Rebecca Sharp , called Becky, is Amelia's opposite, an intelligent young woman with a gift for satire. She is described as a short sandy haired girl who has green eyes and a great deal of wit. Becky is born to a French opera dancer mother and an art teacher and artist father Francis. Fluent in both French and English, Becky has a beautiful singing voice, plays the piano, and shows great talent as an actress. Without a mother to guide her into marriage, Becky resolves that "I must be my own Mamma".

She is extremely manipulative and, after the first few chapters and her failure to attract Jos Sedley, is not shown as being particularly sincere. Never having known financial or social security even as a child, Becky desires it above all things. Nearly everything she does is with the intention of securing a stable position for herself, or herself and her husband after she and Rawdon are married.

She advances Rawdon's interests tirelessly, flirting with men such as General Tufto and the Marquis of Steyne to get him promoted. She also uses her feminine wiles to distract men at card parties while Rawdon cheats them blind. Marrying Rawdon Crawley in secret was a mistake, as was running off instead of begging Miss Crawley's forgiveness. She also fails to manipulate Miss Crawley through Rawdon so as to obtain an inheritance. Although Becky manipulates men very easily, she is less successful with women.

She is utterly hostile to Lady Bareacres [34] , dismissive of Mrs. O'Dowd, and Lady Jane, although initially friendly, eventually distrusts and dislikes her. This comparative loyalty to Amelia stems from Becky having no other friends at school, and Amelia having "by a thousand kind words and offices, overcome Becky's hostility"; 'The gentle tender-hearted Amelia Sedley was the only person to whom she could attach herself in the least; and who could help attaching herself to Amelia?

Rawdon, the younger of the two Crawley sons, is an empty-headed cavalry officer who is his wealthy aunt's favourite until he marries Becky Sharp, who is of a far lower class. He permanently alienates his aunt, who leaves her estate to Rawdon's elder brother Sir Pitt instead. Sir Pitt has by this time inherited their father's estate, leaving Rawdon destitute. He is very good at cards and billiards, and although he does not always win he is able to earn cash by betting against less talented gamblers.

Not particularly talented as a military officer, he is content to let Becky manage his career. Although Rawdon knows Becky is attractive to men, he believes her reputation is spotless even though she is widely suspected of romantic intrigue with General Tufto and other powerful men.

Vanity fair reese changed ending