My antonia the oral history-

To leave a general comment about our Web site, please click here. Also, it could be integrated with an American history course and correlated with the themes of immigration and westward expansion. In addition, it could be used appropriately for English four students if they have not read the novel in their junior year. It should take at least two weeks to cover adequately and experience deeply. Films for the Humanities has produced a film called Willa Cather's America which would serve as an ideal springboard for this unit.

My antonia the oral history

My antonia the oral history

They were within a few miles of their village now. She was a rich mine of life, like the founders of early races. Jim leaves the prairie for college and a career in the east, while Antonia devotes herself to her large family and productive farm. My papa play for his wedding, and he give my papa ajtonia gun, and my papa give you. Grandfather put on silver-rimmed spectacles and read several Psalms. The wolves ran like streaks of shadow; they looked no bigger than My antonia the oral history, but there were hundreds of them. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, antoonia, and larger portions of the text e.

What nicu nurses do. Activity 1. Mapping the Great Plains: Nebraska

Knott Since My antonia the oral history I remember when Paul—you know when we started the campaign, and it was in the Dildos strap on harness Cadillac dealership on M Street, across the street from the steakhouse. Eddy and the History of Christian Science. To this day. Ron Brown, who was his personal staff. You sort of go from state to state, and I developed wonderful friendships that, to this day, I still maintain. In Gorman, Robert F. Because of his passion for labor and education, and they were dual passions. Particularly the Kennedys have had such a—just such a life, the tragedies. Just fascinating people. Additionally, the characters in the story break from stereotypical gender roles — the women are strong, athletic, and active, while the men are generally passive and weak. I think maybe the best place to start is, you were with Senator Kennedy from to officially.

At present, the United Kingdom is due to withdraw from the European Union on 31 October without an agreement in place.

  • When you think about heroes, people that left everything they had to fight a war, you usually think about strong, buff men.
  • Cather, like her character Jim, moved to Nebraska when she was ten years old, and she bases many of the events, characters, and settings of the novel on her own childhood experiences.
  • Institute Overview.
  • It honours the immigrant settlers of the American plains.

At present, the United Kingdom is due to withdraw from the European Union on 31 October without an agreement in place. Request Inspection Copy. The red of the grass made all the great prairie the colour of wine-stains And there was so much motion in it; the whole country seemed, somehow, to be running.

Together they share childhoods spent in a new world. Jim leaves the prairie for college and a career in the east, while Antonia devotes herself to her large family and productive farm. Her story is that of the land itself, a moving portrait of endurance and strength.

Described on publication as 'one of the best [novels] that any American has ever done', My Antonia paradoxically took Cather out of the rank of provincial novelists as the same time that it celebrated the provinces, and mythologized a period of American history that had to be lost before its value could be understood. The Bryant Park Reading Room offers free copies of book club selection while supply lasts, compliments of Oxford University Press, and guest speakers lead the group in discussion.

Oxford University Press is a department of the University of Oxford. It furthers the University's objective of excellence in research, scholarship, and education by publishing worldwide.

Academic Skip to main content. Search Start Search. Choose your country or region Close. Brexit important information for customers details. Dear Customer, At present, the United Kingdom is due to withdraw from the European Union on 31 October without an agreement in place.

We apologize for any inconvenience. To purchase, visit your preferred ebook provider. My Antonia Willa Cather Edited by Janet Sharistanian Oxford World's Classics Willa Cather's best-known novel, this new edition provides a critically up-to-date, contextualizing introduction and notes Includes both Cather's original and revised introductions to her novel Recent critical books on Cather, including a biography, are re-establishing her importance in American literature.

Also of Interest. O Pioneers! Willa Cather, Marilee Lindemann. The Censorship Effect William Olmsted. Pethaven Begetter Imayam, Gita Subramanian. Black Print Unbound Eric Gardner.

Kusumabale Devanoora Mahadeva, Susan Daniel. Agnisakshi Lalithambika Antharjanam, Vasanthi Sankaranarayanan. All Those Strangers Douglas Field.

Look at the relationship between him and Orrin Hatch, and you can duplicate that over and over. So yes, all those. Knott So you voted for Carter that fall. We were laughing, I mean hysterically laughing, at how he tortured the words. They were very politically active, and basically controlled the Latino political apparatus. I was wondering if you could comment on that. At that time, [Gaylord] Nelson was still winning, Culver was still winning, so I still had a job.

My antonia the oral history

My antonia the oral history

My antonia the oral history. Logging out…

Santana eventually was sent to New York City, where she worked as a postal clerk for over a year. For her, participating in the military during WWII turned out to be a good experience -- and she came to enjoy sending letters to other soldiers. Santana enjoyed her time in the WAC, but when she arrived home in Puerto Rico in February , she encountered problems. She found that many did not have a positive view of women who did military service.

People in the U. Santana said all of the women who were in the military were happy and proud to have served. They were also happy to come back home. Yet the comments that men in Puerto Rico were making about them lowered their self-confidence. I had to learn to be tough," she said. Santana said she has noticed changes in the military. She said she believes men and women should be kept separate, just like they were when she was in the military.

For Santana noted, however, that some positive changes have occurred. She said that women have prepared themselves intellectually and professionally.

But she said homes are no longer what they used to be. Nowadays families don't even get together at the dinner table," she said. When Santana left the military and returned to Puerto Rico, she went to the first American beauty school there and later bought her own beauty parlor. After 14 years, she started working for ITT [a telephone company in Puerto Rico] because she said she wanted a reliable salary and a change. Santana married at 23 to her now ex-husband, who was also in the military.

She said he became depressed from what he saw in the war. They had been apart for 30 years at the time of her interview. They had three children together and all got a college education. Santana always found it interesting that her two daughters were born on November 14, the same date she enlisted in the military in The only problem she had with her participation in the war was the discrimination she suffered back home.

Santana was interviewed on Feb. Skip to main content. Antonia Santana. United States. Interviewed By:. Harling, who hires her for good wages. She stays in town for a few years, having her worst experience with Mr. The couple goes out of town while she is their housekeeper, after Mr.

Jim stays there in her place, to be surprised by Mr. Instead, Jim punches him, until he realizes it is the owner of the house. Jim does well in school, the valedictorian of his high school class. He attends the new state university in Lincoln, where his mind is opened to a new intellectual life. In his second year, he finds one of the immigrant farm girls, Lena, is in Lincoln, too, with a successful dressmaking business.

He takes her to plays, which they both enjoy. His teacher realizes that Jim is so distracted from his studies, that he suggests Jim come with him to finish his studies at Harvard in Boston.

He does, where he then studies the law. He becomes an attorney for one of the western railroads. She moves back in with her mother. He visits with them, getting to know her sons especially. She is happy with her brood and all the work of a farm wife.

Jim makes plans to take her sons on a hunting trip next year. It was considered a masterpiece and placed Cather in the forefront of novelists. Today, it is considered her first masterpiece. Instead, each book contains thematic contrasts. Cather also makes a number of comments concerning her views on women's rights, and there are many disguised sexual metaphors in the text.

The original version of My Antonia begins with an Introduction in which an author-narrator, supposed to be Cather herself, converses with her adult friend, Jim Burden, during a train journey. Jim is now a successful New York lawyer but trapped in an unhappy and childless marriage to a wealthy, activist woman. She discovers the book in the apartment of the alcoholic reporter, Burke Devlin, played by Rock Hudson.

After LaVerne's husband, Robert Stack , dies in an airplane racing accident, Burke Devlin sends LaVerne and her son, Jack, on a plane to Chicago, which will connect them to their next flight to Nebraska to start a new life. Harris wrote the song from Jim's perspective as he reflects on his long lost love. About a young Nebraska country boy who has the hots for an older woman" page It is the first novel he ever read, and he expects Iowa to have the same grass "the color of wine stains" that Cather describes of Nebraska.

They went away to strange towns, but when people learned where they came from, they were always asked if they knew the two men who had fed the bride to the wolves.

Wherever they went, the story followed them. My Antonia , a made-for-television movie, was adapted from the novel. The production received an Ivey Award , and toured Minnesota in , , and Nebraska in The adaptation was written by Celebration Company member Jarrett Dapier.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Redirected from My Antonia. Novel by Willa Cather. This article is about the novel by Willa Cather. For the film adaptation, see My Antonia film. Dewey Decimal. The name is pronounced An'-ton-ee-ah. But note that English "Anthony" begins with a different vowel sound. Pavel shares his deathbed confession with them. After Pavel dies, Peter leaves Black Hawk. People often overestimate the size of packs of wolves and individual wolves.

Sharistanian, Janet ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Willa Cather: A Literary Life. Nebraska State Historical Society. Retrieved September 12, In Gorman, Robert F. Pasadena, California: Salem Press. New York: Penguin Books. National Endowment for the Arts. The Big Read. Retrieved July 28, National Endowment of the Arts. New Essays on My Antonia. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

The objective of the Willa Cather Scholarly Edition is to provide to readers—present and future—various kinds of information relevant to Willa Cather's writing, obtained and presented according to the highest scholarly standards: a critical text faithful to her intention as she prepared it for the first edition, a historical essay providing relevant biographical and historical facts, explanatory notes identifying allusions and references, a textual commentary tracing the work through its lifetime and describing Cather's involvement with it, and a record of changes in the text's various editions.

This edition is distinctive in the comprehensiveness of its apparatus, especially in its inclusion of extensive explanatory information that illuminates the fiction of a writer who drew so extensively upon actual experience, as well as the full textual information we have come to expect in a modern critical edition.

It thus connects activities that are too often separate—literary scholarship and textual editing. Editing Cather's writing means recognizing that Cather was as fiercely protective of her novels as she was of her private life. She suppressed much of her early writing and dismissed serial publication of later work, discarded manuscripts and proofs, destroyed letters, and included in her will a stipulation against publication of her private papers.

Yet the record remains surprisingly full. Manuscripts, typescripts, and proofs of some texts survive with corrections and revisions in Cather's hand; serial publications provide final "draft" versions of texts; correspondence with her editors and publishers helps clarify her intention for a work, and publishers' records detail each book's public life; correspondence with friends and acquaintances provides an intimate view of her writing; published interviews with and speeches by Cather provide a running public commentary on her career; and through their memoirs, recollections, and letters, Cather's contemporaries provide their own commentary on circumstances surrounding her writing.

In assembling pieces of the editorial puzzle, we have been guided by principles and procedures articulated by the Committee on Scholarly Editions of the Modern Language Association. Assembling and comparing texts demonstrated the basic tenet of the textual editor—that only painstaking collations reveal what is actually there.

Scholars had assumed, for example, that with the exception of a single correction in spelling, O Pioneers! Collations revealed nearly a hundred word changes, thus providing information not only necessary to establish a critical text and to interpret how Cather composed, but also basic to interpreting how her ideas about art changed as she matured. Cather's revisions and corrections on typescripts and page proofs demonstrate that she brought to her own writing her extensive experience as an editor.

Word changes demonstrate her practices in revising; other changes demonstrate that she gave extraordinarily close scrutiny to such matters as capitalization, punctuation, paragraphing, hyphenation, and spacing. Knowledgeable about production, Cather had intentions for her books that extended to their design and manufacture.

For example, she specified typography, illustrations, page format, paper stock, ink color, covers, wrappers, and advertising copy. To an exceptional degree, then, Cather gave to her work the close textual attention that modern editing practices respect, while in other ways she challenged her editors to expand the definition of "corruption" and "authoritative" beyond the text, to include the book's whole format and material existence.

Believing that a book's physical form influenced its relationship with a reader, she selected type, paper, and format that invited the reader response she sought. The heavy texture and cream color of paper used for O Pioneers! By the same principle, she expressly rejected the anthology format of assembling texts of numerous novels within the covers of one volume, with tight margins, thin paper, and condensed print.

Given Cather's explicitly stated intentions for her works, printing and publishing decisions that disregard her wishes represent their own form of corruption, and an authoritative edition of Cather must go beyond the sequence of words and punctuation to include other matters: page format, paper stock, typeface, and other features of design.

The volumes in the Cather Edition respect those intentions insofar as possible within a series format that includes a comprehensive scholarly apparatus. For example, the Cather Edition has adopted the format of six by nine inches, which Cather approved in Bruce Rogers's elegant work on the Houghton Mifflin Autograph Edition, to accommodate the various elements of design. While lacking something of the intimacy of the original page, this size permits the use of large, generously leaded type and ample margins—points of style upon which the author was so insistent.

In the choice of paper, we have deferred to Cather's declared preference for a warm, cream antique stock. Today's technology makes it difficult to emulate the qualities of hot-metal typesetting and letterpress printing. In comparison, modern phototypesetting printed by offset lithography tends to look anemic and lacks the tactile quality of type impressed into the page. Instead, we have chosen Linotype Janson Text, a modern rendering of the type used by Rogers.

The subtle adjustments of stroke weight in this reworking do much to retain the integrity of earlier metal versions. Therefore, without trying to replicate the design of single works, we seek to represent Cather's general preferences in a design that encompasses many volumes. In each volume in the Cather Edition, the author's specific intentions for design and printing are set forth in textual commentaries.

These essays also describe the history of the texts, identify those that are authoritative, explain the selection of copy-texts or basic texts, justify emendations of the copy-text, and describe patterns of variants. The textual apparatus in each volume—lists of variants, emendations, explanations of emendations, and end-of-line hyphenations—completes the textual story. Historical essays provide essential information about the genesis, form, and transmission of each book, as well as supply its biographical, historical, and intellectual contexts.

Illustrations supplement these essays with photographs, maps, and facsimiles of manuscript, typescript, or typeset pages. Finally, because Cather in her writing drew so extensively upon personal experience and historical detail, explanatory notes are an especially important part of the Cather Edition.

By providing a comprehensive identification of her references to flora and fauna, to regional customs and manners, to the classics and the Bible, to popular writing, music, and other arts—as well as relevant cartography and census material—these notes provide a starting place for scholarship and criticism on subjects long slighted or ignored.

Within this overall standard format, differences occur that are informative in their own right. The straightforward textual history of O Pioneers! The Cather Edition reflects the individuality of each work while providing a standard of reference for critical study. L AST summer I happened to be crossing the plains of Iowa in a season of intense heat, and it was my good fortune to have for a traveling companion James Quayle Burden —Jim Burden, as we still call him in the West.

He and I are old friends—we grew up together in the same Nebraska town — and we had much to say to each other. While the train flashed through never-ending miles of ripe wheat, by country towns and bright-flowered pastures and oak groves wilting in the sun, we sat in the observation car, where the woodwork was hot to the touch and red dust lay deep over everything.

The dust and heat, the burning wind, reminded us of many things. We were talking about what it is like to spend one's childhood in little towns like these, buried in wheat and corn, under stimulating extremes of climate: burning summers when the world lies green and billowy beneath a brilliant sky, when one is fairly stifled in vegetation, in the color and smell of strong weeds and heavy harvests; blustery winters with little snow, when the whole country is stripped bare and gray as sheet-iron.

We agreed that no one who had not grown up in a little prairie town could know anything about it. It was a kind of freemasonry, we said. He is legal counsel for one of the great Western railways, and is sometimes away from his New York office for weeks together. That is one reason why we do not often meet. Another is that I do not like his wife.

When Jim was still an obscure young lawyer, struggling to make his way in New York, his career was suddenly advanced by a brilliant marriage. Genevieve Whitney was the only daughter of a distinguished man. Her marriage with young Burden was the subject of sharp comment at the time. It was said she had been brutally jilted by her cousin, Rutland Whitney, and that she married this unknown man from the West out of bravado. She was a restless, headstrong girl, even then, who liked to astonish her friends.

Later, when I knew her, she was always doing something unexpected. She gave one of her town houses for a Suffrage headquarters, produced one of her own plays at the Princess Theater , was arrested for picketing during a garment-makers' strike, etc. I am never able to believe that she has much feeling for the causes to which she lends her name and her fleeting interest. She is handsome, energetic, executive, but to me she seems unimpressionable and temperamentally incapable of enthusiasm.

Her husband's quiet tastes irritate her, I think, and she finds it worth while to play the patroness to a group of young poets and painters of advanced ideas and mediocre ability.

She has her own fortune and lives her own life. For some reason, she wishes to remain Mrs. James Burden. As for Jim, no disappointments have been severe enough to chill his naturally romantic and ardent disposition. This disposition, though it often made him seem very funny when he was a boy, has been one of the strongest elements in his success.

He loves with a personal passion the great country through which his railway runs and branches. His faith in it and his knowledge of it have played an important part in its development. He is always able to raise capital for new enterprises in Wyoming or Montana, and has helped young men out there to do remarkable things in mines and timber and oil. If a young man with an idea can once get Jim Burden's attention, can manage to accompany him when he goes off into the wilds hunting for lost parks or exploring new canyons, then the money which means action is usually forthcoming.

Jim is still able to lose himself in those big Western dreams. Though he is over forty now, he meets new people and new enterprises with the impulsiveness by which his boyhood friends remember him.

He never seems to me to grow older. His fresh color and sandy hair and quick-changing blue eyes are those of a young man, and his sympathetic, solicitous interest in women is as youthful as it is Western and American. During that burning day when we were crossing Iowa, our talk kept returning to a central figure, a Bohemian girl whom we had known long ago and whom both of us admired. To speak her name was to call up pictures of people and places, to set a quiet drama going in one's brain.

I had lost sight of her altogether, but Jim had found her again after long years, had renewed a friendship that meant a great deal to him, and out of his busy life had set apart time enough to enjoy that friendship. His mind was full of her that day. He made me see her again, feel her presence, revived all my old affection for her. I told him I had always felt that other people—he himself, for one—knew her much better than I. We might, in this way, get a picture of her.

He rumpled his hair with a quick, excited gesture, which with him often announces a new determination, and I could see that my suggestion took hold of him. He stared out of the window for a few moments, and when he turned to me again his eyes had the sudden clearness that comes from something the mind itself sees. It's through myself that I knew and felt her, and I've had no practice in any other form of presentation. He had had opportunities that I, as a little girl who watched her come and go, had not.

Months afterward Jim Burden arrived at my apartment one stormy winter afternoon, with a bulging legal portfolio sheltered under his fur overcoat. He brought it into the sitting-room with him and tapped it with some pride as he stood warming his hands.

I did n't make any. I suppose it has n't any form. It has n't any title, either. My own story was never written, but the following narrative is Jim's manuscript, substantially as he brought it to me. I was ten years old then; I had lost both my father and mother within a year, and my Virginia relatives were sending me out to my grandparents, who lived in Nebraska.

I traveled in the care of a mountain boy, Jake Marpole , one of the "hands" on my father's old farm under the Blue Ridge, who was now going West to work for my grandfather. Jake's experience of the world was not much wider than mine. He had never been in a railway train until the morning when we set out together to try our fortunes in a new world. Beyond Chicago we were under the protection of a friendly passenger conductor, who knew all about the country to which we were going and gave us a great deal of advice in exchange for our confidence.

He wore the rings and pins and badges of different fraternal orders to which he belonged. Once when he sat down to chat, he told us that in the immigrant car ahead there was a family from "across the water" whose destination was the same as ours.

Don't you want to go ahead and see her, Jimmy? She's got the pretty brown eyes, too! This last remark made me bashful, and I shook my head and settled down to "Jesse James.

My antonia the oral history